Ten songs to dance away from a cemetery

No need to go back to Mozart's Requiem to find common bonds between music and death. Both have always been very close since the beginning of history. The universe is full of pop songs in Castilian to remember the dead. We recommend 10 ringtones for 'die' singing.Ten songs to dance away from a cemetery

1. I'll dance on your grave (1985) .- title song of the fourth album Sinister Galician group and never missing a Halloween party this side of the Atlantic. Julián Hernández promotes musical exceeds crime and as a lyricist, 'I cut the throats with a sharp / disc of the Rolling Stones or Shadows / you swallowed collection casettes / Shan-Gri the-Las or the Ronettes'. The band incorporates Javier Soto finally, with keyboards, creates a riff to remember underground. Choirs chorus, 'Chuchué Ua, Ua Chuchua' not invoke the devil.

2. My boyfriend is a Zombie (1989) .- Alaska and Dinarama close his career with this song composed by plants, parallel group bassist Nacho Canut. The band, which had held at the beginning of his career a certain culture Dark, anticipates the saccharine film 'Ghost' Patrick Swayze, and talks about the relationship of a living dead coming from another world to be with your partner. Then came Mario Vaquerizo and TV series with rotten walkers.

3. La Llorona (1994) .- One of the biggest rock groups in Mexico, Caifanes, dares with the legend and create an own version of that lost soul that grieves Latin America. Before, Chavela Vargas, Joan Baez or Raphael, played the lament. It's just a sample. At parties of the Dead, Mexican culture has no competition.

4. It is not serious about this cemetery (1987) .- fourth single from the album 'Between Heaven and soil' Mecano. Ana Torroja, singer, plays with a musical background and recited funeral march at the end of the Latin phrase 'Finis mundi gloriae homini' (The end of the glory of the world of man). Intrigue and mystery are lost when the video clip set in a junkyard car is viewed. Eighties in Spain had those things.

5. The Living Dead (1967) .- Composed by the Colombian Guillermo Gonzalez Arenas, tells a true story of a man who was left for dead in the department of Antioquia and 'was carousing'. The great Cuban artist Rolando Laserie, the Guapachoso, was one of his most outstanding performers. The song was recovered by Peret and adopted by all the Catalan rumba. Now, Serrat and Sabina took her 'reeds' on his tour of Birds and Titanic. Cool, cool, cool.

6. I love you so much (1995) .- The necrophilia is in this song of the Chilean Javiera and the Impossible musical slot. Their successful album 'Court pending', which also contains 'humidity', 'Tomb flowerless' and 'Autopsy', you could not expect anything else. Moreover, in this line, links to other pop songs of the Andean country as 'gas smell' of the three or 'Olas Giants' Denver.

7. Dame veneno (1976) .- First and resounding success of Chunguitos, vallecanos the trio of brothers, born in Extremadura (Spain), who mixed gypsy rumba and melodic song for the greater glory of postindustrial suburbs. The song, produced by the Dynamic Duo, sold 50,000 copies and opened the era of Seat 124, stray dogs and 'Nonaino'.

8. Rascayú (1943) .- No one agrees to find the origin of this song gravedigger who was banned temporarily in Spain by the Franco - 'when you die, what will you do?' - and that popularized the Mallorcan Bonet San Pedro. Paco Clavel, Jorge Illegal, Fangoria or any orchestra playing fair have vibrated this ode to the rebels skeletons.

9. Requiem (1998) .- The world of heavy metal in Spanish has always hovered close to the dark side. The Wizard of Oz Madrid included this topic on his album 'La Leyenda de la Mancha', a conceptual work based on Cervantes' Don Quixote. Guitar solos, manes to the wind and almost falsetto voice for the greater glory of hidalgo with T AC / DC.

10. Today I do not fear death (2006) .- The Argentine port with former Talking Heads David Byrne give us an end to this arbitrary optimistic review of some of the funeral of pop songs in Spanish. Many have been left out and each can make your list (Do not forget to Camilo Sesto). Absences aside from seeking in this chronicle messages from beyond the grave or cabals; it is simply about putting a musical smile to the party of the deceased.

By Juan Carlos Gomi